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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
I have a '91 Z24 with 142k. I have very little mechanical experience, but my Fiancee's father has a lot. He told me the other day that he doesn't think my car will last much longer. Is there anything I can do to help remedy this situation and make my car last longer. I don't have much money to work with, or much free time either becuase i'm working two jobs. Right now, there isn't anything wrong with it (that I know off) except the engine seems to rattle a little sometimes (i'm not sure what that is) and when I give it gas the first couple of times after starting it then the RPM's drop to about 500 and then go up. I also have some minor body rust (behind the skirts and above the wheel wells) that i'm not sure how to get rid of.
Also, does anyone else's clutch rattle a little when the clutch pedal is out? The clutch that was on it when i first bought it rattled, and the pressure plate went so I had the whole clutch and pressure plate replaced, but the new one also rattles. It's not very loud, only noticeable if you listen for it, but i was just wondering if it's normal. It doesn't rattle if you hold the pedal in, only after you release the pedal.

Thanks for any help,
Bubnkell
 

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I can sympathise with the rust, I actually just went outside to put a second coat of paint over my job behind the door skirt.

1) Remove the skirt - there will be a screw on the side of the door by the base, and six (seven?)along the inner bottom edge. Remove all of these. Then slide the skirt upwards, and set it aside. Remove the five plastic plates by pulling out on the right tab and sliding them to the right.

2) Grind - Take a small grinder and go to town on the rust. Most likely it's along the upper edge only, peeking out from over the skirt. Just get off the rough stuff, try not to go through your door.

3) Anti-oxidize - Apply liberal amounts of rust remover/converter, available at your local car parts center, and wait 5-10 minutes. What used to be rust should be turned black. Take a wire brush and see what you can't brush out of there. Don't worry about slipping and scratching nearby paint.

4) Take a block sander and level off the rusted areas with the rest of your door. Again, don't be afraid of hurting your paint. That'll be taken care of later.

5) Everyone's favorite part - Bondo! Don't use the actual name-brand Bondo, though. That's the worst kind. Mix in the hardener, and get to applying and scraping. Let it harden (it doesn't take long, depending on how much hardener you put in the mix). It's okay if some areas of metal still show, you're just filling in the nooks and crannies. No, don't eat it.

6) Feather the area. Feathering puts a fine bevel between the Bondo and the rest of your door, making it come out smoother in the long run.

7) Primer - Plasti Kote works fine, and use grey. I used the red/brown, and I'm still trying to cover it up. Apply two light coats, let dry.

Sand - using a sanding block, use 400 grit wet-dry sandpaper along the bondo and your door. Yes, scratching up your door helps. Apply a second coat if any lines or pits can be seen. If not, finish it off with 800 grit, door and all.

9) Paint - Remember the extra fun scratches we put in? The new paint will settle in fine there, providing a slightly better paint blend. Use Plasti Kote paint. You can look up your color in the provided book alongside your paint selections. Don't worry if it says import color, for some reason my GM 'bright red' is for Toyota, yet it seems to match fine. Be patient while painting, it's always better to not put enough than to put too much.

10) Clear-coat your new paint.

Now, this is for a simple at-home job. I'm sure you could get much better results with a professional painter, but for those with patience, a steady hand, and no money to afford a paint job, a spray can will do the job.

I know this is incredbily overboard. Don't hurt me.
 

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Your clutch rattling sound like it is probably the throwout bearing going bad. Possibly the input shaft.

As for your car dying after you start it, try cleaning your throttle body as per the instructions in the how-to section, that is probably your problem.

Your fiancees dad didn't give you a reason why he said your car won't last much longer?
 

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Okay, all I have left to do is clear-coat. From a short distance, it's indistinguishable from the rest of the car, so I think I did well considering it was a spray can. Just make sure you cover up everything you don't want painted, since I found out even the slightest breeze likes to take the paint dust everywhere. I had a fine coat on my windshield, and it got on my door handle and such. Just a warning, though you should be smarter than I.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
He didn't mention anything specific. I think he was just refering to the age and miles.
I already cleaned my throttle body, and that helped the throttle response a lot except for when the car was just started, but i had a question for you. How fragile is the IAC sensor? I sprayed the carb cleaner into the plate, but I was afraid to break it so I didn't scrub it like I did with the rest.
Is the throwout bearing something that is typically included when you get a new clutch, or usually replaced seperately? My new clutch is only about 4 or 5 months old.

Thanks guys!
 
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