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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Searched a bit but didn't find the answer to my question...

Went to the yearly, mandatory, government-organized 'Automobile Inspection' this morning, where they check out the suspension, lights, brakes, engine and exhaust of every vehicle that's at least four years old.

Car's fine, except that apparently my left rear (stock, drum) brake is 40 percent less effective than the right rear brake. Considering the brakes are 18 years old and have never been changed, it pretty much means I don't have much of a rear braking system.

What are my options? Is it possible to "fix" or "better" the rear left one so it equals the right? The guy said if I managed to do that, he'd let me pass. In the meantime I failed the Inspection and I have two weeks to fix the problem. If fixing is not an option, should I replace both rear brakes?
According to rockauto.com, the parts aren't that expensive, unless I have the wrong article. 60 dollars sound right?

Last question, and almost the most important; does changing rear brakes require any particular mechanical abilities, or can I do it myself? Some of you may know, I've developed quite an aversion to the mechanics of this country, so I'd be greatly pleased to learn that's it's not that hard to do.

Thanks very much for any input.

Eric
 

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adjust the drum. typically they are self adjusting by driving in reverse and stopping mildly. but sometime they don't adjust after a while. so pop off hte drum and rotate the screw a bit, put the drum back on and see if it barely turns now.... and adjust until its stiff to turn. that should be it. if it still doesn't pass, then you'll probly need to get new shoes or drum...both sides replaced at same time. Full rear brakes is pennies only cost me $50 to do shoes and drums.
 

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If they have never been changed, I would suggest replacing the hardware, drums, and shoes. They are kinda a PITA to get done, but just time consuming and frustrating at times. If you do it yourself, disassemble one side at a time so that you have one side to look at so you know how to reassemble things.

Brad
 

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i found doing the rears on our cars pretty easy, i was nervous the first time from hearing people say its hard. I dont know what the fuss is all about lol. Best thing to do is take a picture before you take the shoes and springs off. Also if you are doing them get new hardware(springs) as those are only a few bux also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks all.

I guess I'll start by the screw. If I understand right, I pop off the wheel, pop off the drum, and turn the screw until it's fastened. I guess I should do this on both sides.

Two more questions; what are the "shoes"?
And is it possible that my new 17's make it harder for the brake to brake? My new rims are bigger but actually seem lighter than the stock checker ones.
 

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suberix said:
Thanks all.

I guess I'll start by the screw. If I understand right, I pop off the wheel, pop off the drum, and turn the screw until it's fastened. I guess I should do this on both sides.

Two more questions; what are the "shoes"?
And is it possible that my new 17's make it harder for the brake to brake? My new rims are bigger but actually seem lighter than the stock checker ones.
tighten the screw until you can just barely get the drum back on. your 17's will affect braking because they will have more rotating mass than the stok wheels.... theres no way your 17's are lighter than the 14's :wink: unless they are carbon fiber wheels. the stockers are pretty damn light.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
barrok69 said:
suberix said:
Thanks all.

I guess I'll start by the screw. If I understand right, I pop off the wheel, pop off the drum, and turn the screw until it's fastened. I guess I should do this on both sides.

Two more questions; what are the "shoes"?
And is it possible that my new 17's make it harder for the brake to brake? My new rims are bigger but actually seem lighter than the stock checker ones.
tighten the screw until you can just barely get the drum back on. your 17's will affect braking because they will have more rotating mass than the stok wheels.... theres no way your 17's are lighter than the 14's :wink: unless they are carbon fiber wheels. the stockers are pretty damn light.
Thanks, I'll start on it tomorrow, we'll see what happens. :)
 

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suberix said:
Thanks all.

I guess I'll start by the screw. If I understand right, I pop off the wheel, pop off the drum, and turn the screw until it's fastened. I guess I should do this on both sides.

Two more questions; what are the "shoes"?
And is it possible that my new 17's make it harder for the brake to brake? My new rims are bigger but actually seem lighter than the stock checker ones.
Shoes are the basically brake pads for the rear, they push out to contact the drum which stops the wheel.
 
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